The Evolution of Civil Rights in America – Part 1: The Beginnings of the Modern Civil Rights Movement with David Jeter - Recording Fall 2021

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YouTube Recording – You will be sent a link to a private playlist containing all sessions from Fall 2021 within 48 hours during standard office hours.

On May 8, 1945, the Allies accepted Germany’s unconditional surrender marking the end of World War II in Europe.  One September 2, 1945 aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan formally surrendered to the Allies, bringing an end to World War !!.  The most devastating war in human history was over.

However, the battle by African Americans domestically as they returned from the service to obtain the opportunities, rights and freedoms enjoyed by white Americans and contained within America’s foundational documents, was not over.  And as we will learn in this series, their efforts to secure those rights and freedoms were about to be pursued in earnest.

The impact of World War II on America and American life was monumental in many respects.  The beginning of the modern struggle for equal rights for African Americans was one.

Our goal in Part 1 of this series will be to explore the impact World War II and its aftermath has on the evolution of Civil Rights for African Americans in America – a period we might refer to as the Birth of the Modern Civil Right Movement in America.

Class Fee: $30

Instructor:  David Jeter is a retired attorney, who practiced in Blue Springs for nearly 35 years.  He received his undergraduate degree in history and his law degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia, earning his J.D. in 1973.  He considers himself an amateur historian with wide-ranging interests.  He is a docent at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum and has taught about Truman’s life and times for SPARK in the past.

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