The Evolution of Civil Rights in America – Part 2 with David Jeter: The Beginnings of the Modern Civil Rights Movement Recorded Winter 2022

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YouTube Recording Only – Recorded Winter 2022 – You will receive a link to a private playlist

In Part I, we explored: (The recording of all sessions of part 1 will be made available at no cost to those taking Part II)
1) the evolution of thought regarding liberty and equality from the original ideals of the Declaration of Independence;
2) its expanded understanding in the time of Abraham Lincoln and Reconstruction following the end of the Civil War;
3) the regression of these concepts during the period of Jim Crow and Segregation endorsed by the Separate but Equal Doctrine enunciated and adopted by the US Supreme Court in the landmark case of Plessy v. Ferguson;
4) the Great Migration of Black Americans from the South to large cities in the North between 1915 and 1929 and its impact on the embryonic struggle for Civil Rights by African Americans during that time.

In Part II, we’ll look in detail at the impact of World War II on the battle by African Americans domestically to obtain the opportunities, rights and freedoms enjoyed by white Americans. This post-war period we might refer to as the Birth of the Modern Civil Rights Movement in America.

Instructor: David Jeter is a retired attorney who practiced in Blue Springs for nearly 35 years. He received his undergraduate degree in history and his law degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia, earning his J.D. in 1973. He considers himself an amateur historian with wide-ranging interests. He is a docent at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum and has taught about Truman’s life and times for SPARK in the past.

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